Wednesday, March 26, 2014

Sign up for our Facebook Contest!

***SWEEPSTAKES***

Check out our Brand New Sweepstakes contest! We are giving away a 6lb bag of Diamond Small Breed puppy food, a home made fleece blanket, and a large squeak toy! Just follow these steps:

1: Click this Link: http://a.pgtb.me/HkC5Z
2: Enter your email and click submit!
3: Share with your friends and receive 2 extra entries for each friend that enters. 


The contest runs from 3/25/14-5/6/14, the winner will be announced 5/6/14.
Even if you don't have a pet or don't use Diamond Brand dog food you can still enter and donate the prize to a local Humane Society or Shelter. Good luck to everyone!


Friday, March 7, 2014

How Our Waiting List for Cockapoo Puppies Works

During the Spring and Summer months and during certain Holidays we get really busy with families wanting to adopt our Cockapoo puppies so we generally develop a waiting list. People have paid attention to how fast our puppies are adopted and they have learned that the sooner they reserve in advance the better because that way they don't have to worry about not getting a puppy when they want one. As soon as I post online that we have a waiting list for puppies I get flooded with questions, people often want to know how long our list is and they always fear that they won't get a puppy. It's really hard to give specifics on exactly when a person on our waiting list will get a puppy because it all depends on what they want, how many puppies are born, and what color/sex combination they are. I'll have people call me wanting specific answers and I feel bad because I always have to tell them it depends on the litter and I have to wait until they arrive before I can go into specific details. Here is an example, I am hoping that it helps clear up some of the common questions I get:


When a family gets on our waiting list to reserve a puppy in advance they place a $300 deposit and I ask them to tell me what they are looking for which would be color(s,) sex of the puppy, and if they have a certain time of year that they would prefer getting one. Here is an example of a waiting list that I would have, I will explain how it all works as we go through it.


Family #1 wants a Red Female only and they don't want one until June
Family # 2 wants a Red, Buff, or Apricot Female starting in May
Family #3 wants a Red Male only, any time of year
Family #4 wants a Chocolate Male, any time of year
Family #5 wants a Black Female, starting in May
Family #6 will take any color/sex as soon as possible
Family #7 will take any color female as soon as possible
Family #8 wants a Parti or Merle Male or Female as soon as possible
Family #9 wants any color Male as soon as possible
Family #10 wants a Chocolate Female any time of year


Okay, so the above is my pretend waiting list and lets say it's February 16th and I have a litter of puppies born with a total of 3 Black Females, one Parti Male, and one Chocolate Female and they will be ready for home the beginning of April. Once I know what is born I go to my waiting list and see who is on it and what they are looking for. Family #1 is instantly skipped over because they don't want a puppy until June, Family #2 is skipped because I don't have the color/sex that they want, Family #3 is skipped because I don't have the color/sex they want, Family #4 is skipped because I don't have the sex they want, Family #5 is skipped because they don't want one until May, Family #6 is contacted first because they will take any color or sex as soon as possible, so they went from being #6 on the list to #1 because of what was born in the litter. Once I figure out who is first to contact I send them an email with pictures of the available puppies and ask them to look them over and let me know within 24 hours if they see a puppy they like. If they don't want any of the ones that are available I will move onto the next family in line. So lets say Family #6 looks over the pictures and takes a Black Female, they are happy and now off of my list, leaving 9 families left on the list. I will now contact Family #7 because they will take any color female, so lets say they too take a Black Female, they are now off the list, leaving 8 families left. I then contact Family #8 and tell them I have a Parti Male, fabulous, they are happy with him and take him, one more family off the list and now I am down to 7 people waiting. I skip over Family #9 because they only want a Male and he was adopted by Family #8 and I then contact Family #10 and tell them I have a Chocolate Female, they are happy and adopt her, leaving 6 families on a list that was 10 long. So now I have one Black Female available and no one on my list wants her so I then post her on the website for the public to view and adopt. The remaining people on my waiting list will be contacted when my next litter is born as long as the puppies match what they are looking for. From my example you can see that if you are more open minded about a color/sex combination you can go from being #10 on the list all the way up to #1 because other people are very specific about what they want and you are not.


I hope this example makes it more clear as to why I cannot specifically tell you when I will have a puppy for you, it all depends on what you want and who is born, that is why I don't take deposits for a specific litter. I also hope that it makes the number of people on my waiting list less scary because your turn in line can change, again, all depending on what you want and what I get for puppies.


I have said this a million times but I will say it again, we do not know what color or sex combination we will get until the puppies are born! Our dogs have a ton of different colors in their bloodlines, we do this on purpose so that we can get a nice variety of colors, and each litter is a nice surprise!


Please do contact us if you want to get on our waiting list and reserve a puppy in advance, we take deposits anytime. When a litter is born and it is your turn to pick I will email you pictures of the babies to look over and choose from. You will have 24 hours from the time I email you to make your decision, if I don't hear back from you within that amount of time I will move onto the next family in line. I do not allow visits to pick out newborns in person so if you prefer to see a puppy in person before you adopt then the waiting list may not be the best option for you. Our deposits are non-refundable and once you pick out a puppy the deposit is applied to that specific puppy. We do not transfer deposits to another puppy if you later change your mind and want a different one, the deposit is an agreement that you are going to adopt a specific puppy and that I am not going to sell that specific puppy to anyone else.

One of the biggest things I ask of you when getting on the waiting list is to have patience and understand that you will have to wait for your turn to pick out a puppy. I've had people submit a deposit to get on the list and then email me three days later wondering when I will have a puppy for them. If I have babies due in November and you submit a deposit in November that doesn't necessarily mean that you will get a puppy from that litter, it all depends on what color, sex, how many puppies are born, and how many people are ahead of you in line. Patience is the key to being on a waiting list!




Wednesday, March 5, 2014

Tail Docking: Long and Waggy Tails are Welcomed Here!

Tail docking or cropping is the act of intentionally removing part of an animals tail. This practice, depending on the type of animal, is often done by a licensed vet, a breeder, or by a farmer and can be done in various ways ranging from cutting to banding and burning. Because I am a dog breeder I am going to focus on tail docking in dogs. For canines tail docking is originally thought to have started way back in the Roman Empire, and the most popular reason was to prevent working and hunting dogs from being hurt by the animals they were hunting or by their long tails being caught in the underbrush they were traveling through. In more modern times tail docking was made popular by people thinking it made certain breeds more attractive when they had shorter tails and also during the 1950's rules for pedigree dog shows established standards requiring docked tails for particular breeds. For example, a Cocker Spaniel would be required to have a docked tail and would not be "show worthy" if they had their naturally long tail.
The debate over whether tail docking is ethical has a long history, for a time it was totally acceptable to have a dog with a docked tail, people fully expected certain breeds to automatically have their tails docked when born, and some of that is still true to this day, but I have found that more people have shifted to the other side and prefer their dog's tails naturally long and not docked. I'm not sure that everyone adopting a dog with a docked tail is fully aware of what a painful procedure it is. I think most people like to believe that their dog, when first born, was taken to the vet where it was given  medication and the tail was removed with minimal pain, but the truth is most breeders do it themselves with a knife or tool similar to a nail clippers and the puppy is not given any type of pain medicine. The tail is cut off, the puppy screams, and a powder called 'blood stop' is put on the wound to stop the bleeding. If done wrong it can cause infections, bone can be exposed, and it can later lead to future issues throughout the dogs life.
(The above picture was downloaded off the internet to show tail docking, I do not dock tails, so it is not my personal picture!!)
Having dogs and other animals with tails my entire life I fully realize that the tail is something much more than a cosmetic feature, it is a way for the animal to communicate their emotions with you and other animals. If a dog is scared where does the tail go-right between their legs. If a dog is happy and excited, where does the tail go-all over the place and they usually wag it as hard as they can to express how excited they are. If a dog spots something they aren't sure of or that they want to point out, where does the tail go-usually straight out in a 'pointed' position. If a female is in heat and she is put in with a male, where does the tail go- up and to the side to tell him she's ready to breed. Studies have also shown that even though a dog may be wagging their tail, the direction and pattern of that wag may express different emotions and signals that we, not being dogs, don't understand but others of their kind do.
In the early 90's in the United Kingdom the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons ruled tail docking to be unethical unless it was done for medically necessary reasons, not simply cosmetic. Vets found guilty of doing tail docking for cosmetic purposes face very high fines and potential time in jail. In 1987 Norway banned tail docking, in 2006 it was banned in England, Scotland, and Wales and other countries that have banned the practice include Australia, Austria, Denmark, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, and Sweden amongst many others. I wonder if America will ever change its breed standards and also participate in the tail docking ban?
                   (Again, not my photo, I downloaded it off the internet to show tail docking!!)
We raise Cockapoo puppies and do not dock their tails. A Cockapoo is a cross between a Cocker Spaniel and Poodle and Cockapoos are born with naturally long tails. Cocker Spaniels have a breed standard and are known to have docked tails and I have found that people go either way with Poodles, some breeders automatically dock tails and don't think a Poodle is 'right' without it being done while others leave them natural. We sometimes raise Cocker Spaniels or Poodle puppies when we want new ones for breeding and do not dock either breeds tails. We recently just had a litter of Cocker Spaniel puppies, we were hoping for females but got Males, so we sold them with naturally long tails and were happy to see that people accepted them for who they are, tails and all. I do on occasion have people call me inquiring about a puppy and tell me that they don't want one if it doesn't have a docked tail and I am fine with that, I respect their opinion, but they will have to go elsewhere for a puppy because I will not do it. If having a docked tail is something you are adamant about when adopting a puppy please be sure to ask the breeder about it before you put down a deposit on a puppy. In the past I have had people reserve a puppy and then ask me later if I would dock its tail and the answer will always be no, even if they offer to pay for it.  I have found customers that were unsure about their puppies having a long tail now really appreciate that we did not dock them and I get a lot of comments from people thanking us for not participating in the practice. If you have a dog, or a cat, or another animal that has a long tail sit down and pay attention to how they use their tail and you will see it is much more than a cosmetic feature.
                                                              Cocker Spaniel with a docked tail (not our dog)

                                                              Mini Poodle with a docked tail (not our dog)
                                   One of our Cockapoo puppies, look at that beautiful tail :)
                      Another one of our beautiful Cockapoo puppies with a long and waggy tail!!